ABOUT

  • The science is done. At SRS Genetics, we know in precise detail the genetic pathway for producing high fleece weights of exquisite quality wool on smooth bodied Merino sheep. The blueprint lies in the unique patterning of wool follicles in the skin that the SRS breeding methods deliver.  It allows wool fibres of high uniformity, alignment, smoothness and elasticity to be grown by Merino sheep that are naturally resistant to fly strike and never need to be mulesed.

    The SRS Genetics that deliver these breeding outcomes are readily available. We produce 12,000 rams each year from 30 Merino studs located throughout Australia. Sourcing these rams is the key to changing your flock and profitability from more wool, better wool and more lambs. 

    The SRS visual classing and breeding methods are entirely new and precise in identifying the right animals. We can show you what to look for. You will be able to use this important information immediately for the classing of your ewes. Combine this with sourcing SRS Genetics rams and you will be able to stop mulesing within 3 to 5 years.

  • The science is done. At SRS Genetics, we know in precise detail the genetic pathway for producing high fleece weights of exquisite quality wool on smooth bodied Merino sheep. The blueprint lies in the unique patterning of wool follicles in the skin that the SRS breeding methods deliver.  It allows wool fibres of high uniformity, alignment, smoothness and elasticity to be grown by Merino sheep that are naturally resistant to fly strike and never need to be mulesed.

    The SRS Genetics that deliver these breeding outcomes are readily available. We produce 12,000 rams each year from 30 Merino studs located throughout Australia. Sourcing these rams is the key to changing your flock and profitability from more wool, better wool and more lambs. 

  • The SRS visual classing and breeding methods are entirely new and precise in identifying the right animals. We can show you what to look for. You will be able to use this important information immediately for the classing of your ewes. Combine this with sourcing SRS Genetics rams and you will be able to stop mulesing within 3 to 5 years.

  • The science is done. At SRS Genetics, we know in precise detail the genetic pathway for producing high fleece weights of exquisite quality wool on smooth bodied Merino sheep. The blueprint lies in the unique patterning of wool follicles in the skin that the SRS breeding methods deliver.  It allows wool fibres of high uniformity, alignment, smoothness and elasticity to be grown by Merino sheep that are naturally resistant to fly strike and never need to be mulesed.

    The SRS Genetics that deliver these breeding outcomes are readily available. We produce 12,000 rams each year from 30 Merino studs located throughout Australia. Sourcing these rams is the key to changing your flock and profitability from more wool, better wool and more lambs. 

    The SRS visual classing and breeding methods are entirely new and precise in identifying the right animals. We can show you what to look for. You will be able to use this important information immediately for the classing of your ewes. Combine this with sourcing SRS Genetics rams and you will be able to stop mulesing within 3 to 5 years.

THE SHEEP

  • SRS Merino sheep are plain bodied animals with a distinctive fleece structure and loose, thin skin that sets it apart from other Merino sheep.

    This the outcome of selecting the sheep for high density and length of wool fibres. The response to selection is rapid. We have already doubled the length of fleece grown by the sheep and increased the fibre density by about 50 %.

    The added benefits of pursuing this breeding program have been that the sheep:

    • Are naturally resistant to fleece rot and all forms of fly strike, and do not need to be mulesed.
    • Are easy to shear
    • Have many more lambs and many fewer lamb losses
    • Produce wool that is very soft, lustrous and deeply crimped and processes exceedingly well
    • Are fit and robust

    img2

    Caption:  SRS Merino ewes, 12 months old and unshorn, after prolonged and heavy rain.  The sheep are resistant to fleece rot and fly strike. The sheep are not mulesed. The sheep look like “clones”

  • SRS Merino ram in 10 months wool. Despite the plain bodied appearance of the animal, it has measurably high density and length of wool fibres, which gives it high fleece weight and low fibre diameter. This sheep is not mulesed.

    An SRS Poll Merino ram with the desired features: plain bodied, open faced, floppy fleece consisting of closely packed and long fibre bundles, great depth of body, excellent feet structure and good outlook.

  • SRS Merino rams.  Plain breeches, deep twist to hindquarters and wide stance.

    Close up of a parted fleece of an SRS Merino ram. Note the deep and bold crimp, high lustre and whiteness of the long, thin and well-defined staples.

  • SRS Merino and Poll Merino rams, 12 months old and  carrying 5 months wool growth. Note the plain bodies and the way the fleece surface consists of closely packed, fibre bundles. These sheep are not mulesed.

    Young SRS ram with a wrinkle-free and bare breech. This sheep is not mulesed.

  • SRS Merino ewe, 14 months old, 4 months wool growth, fibre diameter of 14.2 microns. Note the animal is plain bodied, the fleece surface consists of closely packed fibre bundles and the wool is bold and deep crimping.

    The same SRS Merino ewe, 14 months old  with 4 months wool growth.  Note the bold, deep crimp and high fleece length. The fibre diameter is only 14.2 microns. The ewe produced a lot of wool.

  • SRS Merino ram, 4 years of age, being shorn in 6 months wool.  Note how the wool emerging from the skin is arranged as fibre bundles and thin staples. Each fibre bundle is only one to two millimetres wide. This sheep is not mulesed.

    SRS Merino sheep can be shorn cleanly and quickly as there is no skin wrinkle

  • An SRS Merino ram, 4 years of age and just shorn. Note the loose and thin skin on the wrinkle free body. This sheep is not mulesed.

    SRS Merino ewes, 9 months of age and just shorn. Note plain bodies with wrinkle-free skins. These sheep are not mulesed.

  • SRS Merino sheep are plain bodied animals with a distinctive fleece structure and loose, thin skin that sets it apart from other Merino sheep.

    This the outcome of selecting the sheep for high density and length of wool fibres. The response to selection is rapid. We have already doubled the length of fleece grown by the sheep and increased the fibre density by about 50 %.

    The added benefits of pursuing this breeding program have been that the sheep:

    • Are naturally resistant to fleece rot and all forms of fly strike, and do not need to be mulesed.
    • Are easy to shear
    • Have many more lambs and many fewer lamb losses
    • Produce wool that is very soft, lustrous and deeply crimped and processes exceedingly well
    • Are fit and robust

    img2

    Caption:  SRS Merino ewes, 12 months old and unshorn, after prolonged and heavy rain.  The sheep are resistant to fleece rot and fly strike. The sheep are not mulesed. The sheep look like “clones”

  • SRS Merino ram in 10 months wool. Despite the plain bodied appearance of the animal, it has measurably high density and length of wool fibres, which gives it high fleece weight and low fibre diameter. This sheep is not mulesed.

    An SRS Poll Merino ram with the desired features: plain bodied, open faced, floppy fleece consisting of closely packed and long fibre bundles, great depth of body, excellent feet structure and good outlook.

  • SRS Merino rams.  Plain breeches, deep twist to hindquarters and wide stance.

    Close up of a parted fleece of an SRS Merino ram. Note the deep and bold crimp, high lustre and whiteness of the long, thin and well-defined staples.

  • SRS Merino and Poll Merino rams, 12 months old and  carrying 5 months wool growth. Note the plain bodies and the way the fleece surface consists of closely packed, fibre bundles. These sheep are not mulesed.

    Young SRS ram with a wrinkle-free and bare breech. This sheep is not mulesed.

  • SRS Merino ewe, 14 months old, 4 months wool growth, fibre diameter of 14.2 microns. Note the animal is plain bodied, the fleece surface consists of closely packed fibre bundles and the wool is bold and deep crimping.

    The same SRS Merino ewe, 14 months old  with 4 months wool growth.  Note the bold, deep crimp and high fleece length. The fibre diameter is only 14.2 microns. The ewe produced a lot of wool.

  • SRS Merino ram, 4 years of age, being shorn in 6 months wool.  Note how the wool emerging from the skin is arranged as fibre bundles and thin staples. Each fibre bundle is only one to two millimetres wide. This sheep is not mulesed.

    SRS Merino sheep can be shorn cleanly and quickly as there is no skin wrinkle

  • An SRS Merino ram, 4 years of age and just shorn. Note the loose and thin skin on the wrinkle free body. This sheep is not mulesed.

    SRS Merino ewes, 9 months of age and just shorn. Note plain bodies with wrinkle-free skins. These sheep are not mulesed.

  • SRS Merino sheep are plain bodied animals with a distinctive fleece structure and loose, thin skin that sets it apart from other Merino sheep.

    This the outcome of selecting the sheep for high density and length of wool fibres. The response to selection is rapid. We have already doubled the length of fleece grown by the sheep and increased the fibre density by about 50 %.

    The added benefits of pursuing this breeding program have been that the sheep:

    • Are naturally resistant to fleece rot and all forms of fly strike, and do not need to be mulesed.
    • Are easy to shear
    • Have many more lambs and many fewer lamb losses
    • Produce wool that is very soft, lustrous and deeply crimped and processes exceedingly well
    • Are fit and robust

    img2

    Caption:  SRS Merino ewes, 12 months old and unshorn, after prolonged and heavy rain.  The sheep are resistant to fleece rot and fly strike. The sheep are not mulesed. The sheep look like “clones”

  • SRS Merino ram in 10 months wool. Despite the plain bodied appearance of the animal, it has measurably high density and length of wool fibres, which gives it high fleece weight and low fibre diameter. This sheep is not mulesed.

    An SRS Poll Merino ram with the desired features: plain bodied, open faced, floppy fleece consisting of closely packed and long fibre bundles, great depth of body, excellent feet structure and good outlook.

  • SRS Merino rams.  Plain breeches, deep twist to hindquarters and wide stance.

    Close up of a parted fleece of an SRS Merino ram. Note the deep and bold crimp, high lustre and whiteness of the long, thin and well-defined staples.

  • SRS Merino and Poll Merino rams, 12 months old and  carrying 5 months wool growth. Note the plain bodies and the way the fleece surface consists of closely packed, fibre bundles. These sheep are not mulesed.

    Young SRS ram with a wrinkle-free and bare breech. This sheep is not mulesed.

  • SRS Merino ewe, 14 months old, 4 months wool growth, fibre diameter of 14.2 microns. Note the animal is plain bodied, the fleece surface consists of closely packed fibre bundles and the wool is bold and deep crimping.

    The same SRS Merino ewe, 14 months old  with 4 months wool growth.  Note the bold, deep crimp and high fleece length. The fibre diameter is only 14.2 microns. The ewe produced a lot of wool.

  • SRS Merino ram, 4 years of age, being shorn in 6 months wool.  Note how the wool emerging from the skin is arranged as fibre bundles and thin staples. Each fibre bundle is only one to two millimetres wide. This sheep is not mulesed.

    SRS Merino sheep can be shorn cleanly and quickly as there is no skin wrinkle

  • An SRS Merino ram, 4 years of age and just shorn. Note the loose and thin skin on the wrinkle free body. This sheep is not mulesed.

    SRS Merino ewes, 9 months of age and just shorn. Note plain bodies with wrinkle-free skins. These sheep are not mulesed.

THE WOOL

  • The SRS® Merino fleece consists of fine fibres that are highly aligned and long. The fibres are very uniform in diameter and length to each other, and are remarkable in having low variation in diameter along the length of the fibres.

    The fibres also have high crimp amplitude (“deep crimp”) and low crimp frequency (“bold crimp”) and are notable for high tensile strength and elasticity.

    The surfaces of the fibres are smooth and very soft, being formed by long cuticular scales of low scale height.

    The fleeces grow so rapidly that many SRS® Merino sheep are shorn twice a year, reaching a combing length of 80 to 90 millimetres in six months.

    Well-gully-Ram-lamb-fleece-August-2016-IMG_0590

    SRS Merino fleece from a 12 months old ram lamb. The fleece consists of fibre bundles and thin staples. There are no thick staples present.

  • Well-Gully-IMG_7304_mini

    An SRS Merino fleece. Again, the fibre bundles are very obvious, and threaded amongst the thin staples. The wool is outstanding for crimp definition, lustre, softness and alignment of wool fibres. These are superb spinning wools.

    SRS(R)-Merino-wool-P2100016_mini

    SRS Merino wool.  Fibre uniformity is amazing.

  • SRS Merino wools have smooth surfaced fibres of low scale height (above).  Other Merino fibres have rougher surfaces with protruding scales.

    Neville-Jackson-Final14549_mini

    SRS Merino wool fibres (above) are highly aligned and form distinct crimp waves (x …magnification). Other Merino wools (below) often have entangled fibres that form indistinct crimp waves.

  • The SRS® Merino fleece consists of fine fibres that are highly aligned and long. The fibres are very uniform in diameter and length to each other, and are remarkable in having low variation in diameter along the length of the fibres.

    The fibres also have high crimp amplitude (“deep crimp”) and low crimp frequency (“bold crimp”) and are notable for high tensile strength and elasticity.

    The surfaces of the fibres are smooth and very soft, being formed by long cuticular scales of low scale height.

    The fleeces grow so rapidly that many SRS® Merino sheep are shorn twice a year, reaching a combing length of 80 to 90 millimetres in six months.

    Well-gully-Ram-lamb-fleece-August-2016-IMG_0590

    SRS Merino fleece from a 12 months old ram lamb. The fleece consists of fibre bundles and thin staples. There are no thick staples present.

  • Well-Gully-IMG_7304_mini

    An SRS Merino fleece. Again, the fibre bundles are very obvious, and threaded amongst the thin staples. The wool is outstanding for crimp definition, lustre, softness and alignment of wool fibres. These are superb spinning wools.

    SRS(R)-Merino-wool-P2100016_mini

    SRS Merino wool.  Fibre uniformity is amazing.

  • SRS Merino wools have smooth surfaced fibres of low scale height (above).  Other Merino fibres have rougher surfaces with protruding scales.

    Neville-Jackson-Final14549_mini

    SRS Merino wool fibres (above) are highly aligned and form distinct crimp waves (x …magnification). Other Merino wools (below) often have entangled fibres that form indistinct crimp waves.

  • The SRS® Merino fleece consists of fine fibres that are highly aligned and long. The fibres are very uniform in diameter and length to each other, and are remarkable in having low variation in diameter along the length of the fibres.

    The fibres also have high crimp amplitude (“deep crimp”) and low crimp frequency (“bold crimp”) and are notable for high tensile strength and elasticity.

    The surfaces of the fibres are smooth and very soft, being formed by long cuticular scales of low scale height.

    The fleeces grow so rapidly that many SRS® Merino sheep are shorn twice a year, reaching a combing length of 80 to 90 millimetres in six months.

    Well-gully-Ram-lamb-fleece-August-2016-IMG_0590

    SRS Merino fleece from a 12 months old ram lamb. The fleece consists of fibre bundles and thin staples. There are no thick staples present.

  • Well-Gully-IMG_7304_mini

    An SRS Merino fleece. Again, the fibre bundles are very obvious, and threaded amongst the thin staples. The wool is outstanding for crimp definition, lustre, softness and alignment of wool fibres. These are superb spinning wools.

    SRS(R)-Merino-wool-P2100016_mini

    SRS Merino wool.  Fibre uniformity is amazing.

  • SRS Merino wools have smooth surfaced fibres of low scale height (above).  Other Merino fibres have rougher surfaces with protruding scales.

    Neville-Jackson-Final14549_mini

    SRS Merino wool fibres (above) are highly aligned and form distinct crimp waves (x …magnification). Other Merino wools (below) often have entangled fibres that form indistinct crimp waves.

Processing trials in six global markets by a large vertically integrated Japanese processor have consistently shown major efficiencies of using SRS® fibre as shown below.

Mill Number of
trials
Wool top
Hauteur Short fibre content Noil
Italy
(17.3 to 17.9 microns)
4 + 11% -12% to -25% -7% to -13%
Japan
(18.7 to 20.7 microns)
6 + 4% to + 9% -21% to -35% 0% to -25%
Australia
(18.2 to 18.7 microns)
4 + 14% -58% – 39%

The Hauteur (average fibre length) of the wool top was improved markedly whilst the short fibre content and noil wastage were decreased considerably. Yarn breakages during spinning were reduced by 20% to 30%. The company described the fabric produced as soft and silky with very good natural strength and elasticity.

Blog

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Farms and Studs